Sunday, March 15, 2020

Thematical Lives Of Dickens Characters Essays - Free Essays

Thematical Lives Of Dickens Characters Essays - Free Essays Thematical Lives of Dickens' Characters Charles Dickens' literary works are comparable to one another in many ways; plot, setting, and even experiences. His novels remain captivating to his audiences and he draws them in to teach the readers lessons of life. Although each work exists separate from all of the rest, many similarities remain. Throughout the novels, Oliver Twist and Great Expectations, the process of growing up, described by the author, includes the themes of the character's ability to alienate themselves, charity given to the characters and what the money does to their lives, and the differences of good and evil individuals and the effects of their influences. Collectively, these major novels overflow with orphans, adoptive parents, guardians, and failed parent-child relationships. Oliver, the main character in Oliver Twist, must forget about his "infantile past" (Marcus 182) in order to seek "the idyllic future" (Marcus 182). He gets hurled from orphanages to foster parents and so on until he finds himself a portion of the "wrong crowd." The pickpockets take him under their authority and attempt to show him the ropes of the embezzling operation. The orphan Carter 2 adapts well to the swindling lifestyle of Fagin and the boys, and through a series of mischievous choices, authorities apprehend him for stealing (although Dodger was the true felon), and Oliver must live with the consequences. Great Expectations also emphasizes the process of growing up through Pip, the main character. Pip's mother and father passed away while he was young, and he was forced to reside in the house of his older sister and her husband. The boy obtains many idealistic fathers, including Joe, Magwitch, Jaggers and Pumblechook, but none of these men can give him what he needs from a predecessor. Dickens demonstrates to the reader the consequences that bad parenting has on children. Some children are warped by the "knottiest roots" (Lucas 141). Pip, Estella, and Magwitch are all examples of hurt children. The bitter children dwell on their past, or "what has been forgotten" (Marcus 182), and blame the parents for their sufferings. Other children such as Joe and Herbert s urvive bad parents and go on with their lives, not letting the history affect the outlook. Personalities in the novels became cut off physically or spiritually from human companionship. Oliver suffers from a sense of estrangement. He fears being abandoned by foster parents and friends, even though the relationships are not healthy for him. Consider his relationship with Dodger. The orphan was told to "take Dodgers advice and do what he does" (Oliver 138) by Fagin in order to succeed. Oliver knew that his new Carter 3 friends were bad influences on him, but yet he remained with the clique to keep from feeling a hint of isolation. In Great Expectations, Ms. Havisham, resembling Pip, Estella, and Jaggers, acquires a sense of mutilation from her locked up feelings. In her past, she was abandoned by her fianc? at the altar on her wedding day. Ironically, the old woman, so terrified of the idea of being alone, alienates herself from most human contact. After the horror of her love's departure, she does not allow anything in the house to change. Wedding cake still sits on tables, clocks unexpectedly stopped at the exact time that she was deserted, and she lives in the past and denies the future. Desperately, she withers away "corpse-like" (Great 54) in solitude. Largely through Joe, Warwick, Herbert, Wemmick and Wopsle, Pip learns to form bonds of love. Bound to Estella through his affection for her, he does not realize her teasing games. She does not seem to display the same feelings towards him, but h e believes that he will win her emotions. This relationship matures into the destruction of Pip, but his fear of existing in seclusion keeps his helpless, constant infatuation burning. This "twist of fate finds Pip sadly and searchingly wanting" (Sucksmith 186). Dickens suggests that charity, like love, will earn integrity only if honest. Indicated in Oliver Twist, is the impression that true concern for people dwells in individuals, not in institutions. From the beginning, in the orphanage, Oliver was the Carter 4 object of people's benevolence. He obtained food, clothing, and shelter, but lived in horrible conditions and

Friday, February 28, 2020

To What Extent can Standardized Tests be used in Measuring the Article

To What Extent can Standardized Tests be used in Measuring the Competitiveness of Nursing School Curricula - Article Example Administering the same tests for all nursing graduates can judge whether or not the curriculum of a greater number of nursing schools across the country are competitive enough compared to other schools in producing highly-skilled nurses. Article Summaries The first article discusses the comparison of baccalaureate students from different schools that were enrolled in either problem-based curricula (PBL) or those in a conventional nursing program. Using a self-report questionnaire and scores in the National Nursing Registration Examination (RN Exam), the perceptions and abilities of the students were measured. It was found out that although the RN Exam scores did not differ significantly among the different schools that participated, the perceptions of preparedness and educational satisfaction did differ in the two curricula, with the PBL students reporting higher perceived preparedness and satisfaction (Rideout, et al., 2002). The authors recommended exploring further the relationshi p between educational approaches and student outcomes in order to create better nursing curricula in different schools. The second article discusses the importance of the use of external curriculum assessments like the NCLEX-RN. Every three years or so, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) updates their licensure exams to reflect the changing trends in healthcare. While the NCLEX-RN was not specifically designed to be used as an assessment tool for measuring the effectiveness of the curricula in all nursing schools, pass rates for each school in the NCLEX-RN determines whether the nursing degree program deserves to be accredited or not (Morrison, 2005). Thus, the higher the pass rates the school has, the more competitive it seems in the eyes of incoming students as well as for hiring parties. Integrated Analyses Both articles discussed the use of standardized examinations and assessments in order to measure the abilities and perceptions of various graduates of nur sing schools. The first article used the RN Exam as a standardized test in assessing the preparedness of newly-graduated students from different schools and curricula for their career in nursing. The second article brought focus on the use of NCLEX-RN in assessing the curriculum’s effectiveness or weaknesses in preparing students for national licensure exams. By using standardized tests, biases in the judging of school curricula can be eliminated. To put contrasts between the two articles, the first one used the RN Exam was as a standard in measuring the preparedness of newly-graduated students from different schools and nursing curricula. While it was a good measure of knowledge, it was not able to measure the satisfaction of the students in their education or in their perceived efficiency of the curriculum of the school. The second article used NCLEX-RN as their standard in assessing whether the curricula of most nursing schools need improvement, or if the teachers needed t o modify their methods in teaching. Reflection Based on the two articles, it can be inferred that the use of standardized testing is very relevant and imperative in comparing the capabilities of

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Companies Conflict Resolution in Focus group Essay

Companies Conflict Resolution in Focus group - Essay Example External conflicts comprise of situations and issues seemingly created by others and which threaten personal and professional goals and desires of a person. It is often observed that poor communication among the workers and administrators lead to conflicting situations. â€Å"If resolution to a conflict is to end properly, it must begin properly – by negotiating a solvable problem. Therefore, the act of successful conflict resolution begins with the way the problem is examined† (Erickson). Thus, the best way to tackle workplace conflicts is to provide a neutral platform to the involved parties and thrash out the differences with a mediator with clear intention of solving it. The mediator is a person who facilitates easy communication between two warring groups or individuals with a well planned strategy. These facilitators are experts who specialize in human psychology with good listening power. They are assertive without being aggressive and confront the problems with an open mind which inspires confidence of the individuals involved. They provide an atmosphere that eases tension among the participants and promotes a proactive session where people can put forward their opinions without the threat of a backlash. These mediators often believe in forming focus groups of individuals followed by an interactive session among the group members with the facilitator subtly guiding the group towards resolution of the dispute or conflict and help generate as many different ideas and opinions as possible within a given time schedule. The mediators or moderators are helped by assistant moderator who takes notes and runs the recording of the discussion. Focus group is characterized by its homogeneity with relatively small number of people (normally from 8 to 12 persons) each of who are encouraged to voice their opinions. Main objective of the formation of the group is to go deep into the problem and

Friday, January 31, 2020

The Hill Project Management Company's Competitive Edge Term Paper

The Hill Project Management Company's Competitive Edge - Term Paper Example This research study highlights that technological changes and the problems in the economy commonly cause environmental threats to the businesses. Better and innovative ways need to be brought to fore in order to minimize these threats. Therefore, by making an environmental scan, the Hill project Management Company would be able to arrive at better solutions.As the paper stresses the environmental scanning shows that the business is competitive and currently commands a domineering position in its domain. It is seen from the fact that the business has proved itself to be efficient in several areas. The strengths connected with the business may be quality services, better support from the side of the government, good organizational climate and better conditions in the workplace. The strengths possessed by the business will assist the organization in arriving at best possible results. Eventually better market conditions will be created .Ultimately, all these factors will make the busines s well equipped and fortified. The aim of having proper understanding of the present conditions is to run the business in an active pace. Possessing proper control on the prevailing conditions is necessary to have a competitive advantage in the market.  The main competitors of the Hill Project Management Company are Acorn Energy, Inc. and Aecom Technology Corporation. It can be seen that the check is likely to be created upon one or the other particular regions.... Eventually better market conditions will be created .Ultimately, all these factors will make the business well equipped and fortified. The aim of having proper understanding of the present conditions is to run the business in an active pace. Possessing proper control on the prevailing conditions is necessary to have a competitive advantage in the market. 3. The main competitors of the Hill Project Management Company are Acorn Energy, Inc. and Aecom Technology Corporation. It can be seen that the check is likely to be created upon one or the other particular regions. These companies are quite active at the project and construction business. Moreover, the image so created by these two industries is quite attractive and appealing too. The business has to strive hard in order to face the challenges set by these two business giants. The business has to see to it that the situations require to be made efficient and knowledgeable in approach. â€Å"Profit maximization is a good thing for a company but can be a bad thing for  consumers  if the company  starts  to use cheaper  products  or decides to raise  prices† (Profit Maximization, 2013, par.1). One of the strategies that would prove fruitful is to increase profits and value for stakeholders at large. Basically, the industry should aim a higher target by making sure that the output requirements are met and remain productive throughout. For this, the check is likely to be worked upon on one or more of the respective regions. The Hill Project Management Company would implement strategic planning, which would be viewed as a precious extension to their production. Profits margin can be increased by employing best possible strategic moves followed by best

Thursday, January 23, 2020

The Pioneers and Cars Essay -- American History Asians Essays

The Pioneers and Cars With the popularity of movies like The Fast and the Furious and its sequel Too Fast Too Furious, import car culture has now become mainstream. What had started out as a small subset of Southern California car culture has quickly become part of American culture. In the same way hot rodding of the 50s and muscle cars of the 60s was a cultural lifestyle of the youths of that era, the import scene is now the new car culture of our generation. Car culture runs deeply in California. Hot rodders and street racers daily cruise the streets, all started from Asian Americans' love of import cars and racing. Since most Asian Americans in the late 70s and 80s drove Japanese imports, they could not compete with the much more powerful Detroit muscle cars. This resulted in a street-racing scene consisting solely of modified imports. But a lack of aftermarket parts to make the various Toyotas Hondas and Nissans go faster meant that drivers often used nitrous oxide as the best way to compete. As the competition increased, so did the speed and danger. One Asian American who had a vision to race safely also wanted to race at the local drag strip. Unfortunately the track was only reserved for V8's, Mustangs, or Cameros. Frank Choi set out to form an imports only drag race where the track turned away all the muscle cars. His vision became what is now called the Battle of the Imports, one of the most popular drag series and the first of which was started in 1990. Today there is a professional drag racing series by the National Hot Rod Association as well as the Nopi Drag Racing Association run by an aftermarket company out of Atlanta called Nopi. Some of the best and most popular import ... ...t is known today as the import culture or import scene. It is a set of people who challenged the norms and did what couldn't be done. Nobody thought a front wheel drive car could do the quarter mile in 11 seconds, 10 seconds, 9 seconds and then, 8 seconds. Today front wheel drive drag cars can do 8 second passes. I look to them for inspiration for what I would like my car to be in the future. I hope that I can achieve as much as they have done as the underdog, as an entrepreneur, and doing what they most loved. In an import world dominated by Asian Americans, the scene today has no color lines. It began from Asian American culture's love for cars and wanting to race to proving you don't need a V8 to be fast. As time goes by, the industry will grow and cars will get even faster. Props to the pioneers that wouldn't be denied the chance to do what they love. The Pioneers and Cars Essay -- American History Asians Essays The Pioneers and Cars With the popularity of movies like The Fast and the Furious and its sequel Too Fast Too Furious, import car culture has now become mainstream. What had started out as a small subset of Southern California car culture has quickly become part of American culture. In the same way hot rodding of the 50s and muscle cars of the 60s was a cultural lifestyle of the youths of that era, the import scene is now the new car culture of our generation. Car culture runs deeply in California. Hot rodders and street racers daily cruise the streets, all started from Asian Americans' love of import cars and racing. Since most Asian Americans in the late 70s and 80s drove Japanese imports, they could not compete with the much more powerful Detroit muscle cars. This resulted in a street-racing scene consisting solely of modified imports. But a lack of aftermarket parts to make the various Toyotas Hondas and Nissans go faster meant that drivers often used nitrous oxide as the best way to compete. As the competition increased, so did the speed and danger. One Asian American who had a vision to race safely also wanted to race at the local drag strip. Unfortunately the track was only reserved for V8's, Mustangs, or Cameros. Frank Choi set out to form an imports only drag race where the track turned away all the muscle cars. His vision became what is now called the Battle of the Imports, one of the most popular drag series and the first of which was started in 1990. Today there is a professional drag racing series by the National Hot Rod Association as well as the Nopi Drag Racing Association run by an aftermarket company out of Atlanta called Nopi. Some of the best and most popular import ... ...t is known today as the import culture or import scene. It is a set of people who challenged the norms and did what couldn't be done. Nobody thought a front wheel drive car could do the quarter mile in 11 seconds, 10 seconds, 9 seconds and then, 8 seconds. Today front wheel drive drag cars can do 8 second passes. I look to them for inspiration for what I would like my car to be in the future. I hope that I can achieve as much as they have done as the underdog, as an entrepreneur, and doing what they most loved. In an import world dominated by Asian Americans, the scene today has no color lines. It began from Asian American culture's love for cars and wanting to race to proving you don't need a V8 to be fast. As time goes by, the industry will grow and cars will get even faster. Props to the pioneers that wouldn't be denied the chance to do what they love.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Emancipation Proclamation in 1863

To what extent were African-American slaves â€Å"free† after the abolition of slavery by the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863? What challenges did they face after their emancipation? This is a subject of continued interest. History is rife with records of decades of untold torture and harrowing experiences. African-American slaves suffered at the hands of their captors and masters. They were denied all natural rights as human beings and forced to live like animals. A slave was viewed as one-third of a person and the property of their owner(s) and treated as objects, mere things.One would therefore assume that after their emancipation, life would become significantly better because the slaves were free to move away from the torturous hands of their masters. Indeed these slaves were truly hopeful to live as free people in their new land of opportunities. Regrettably, many of them faced incredible opposition and discrimination even after emancipation. Being emancipated from sla very did not, for instance, make the former slaves enjoy equal treatment as the white population. Life continued to be unbearable for them. Thus by and large, the emancipation of the African-American slaves did not truly free them nor directly lead to an increased quality of life or standard of living. It was only the beginning of that dream. Investigation Over the course of many centuries the idea of freedom has been tossed back and forth, constantly being modified to fit the standards of those times. This ideology has also steadily progressed through history. As far back as history can tell us, freedom was virtually non-existent. People were under the absolute rule of kings and monarchs. As revolts and rebellions occurred against these monarchs the idea of freedom gradually evolved. Citizens began to recognize that they were equal as human beings and had rights, thus refused to blindly follow their incapable leaders any longer. With this change also came a revolution in the government. Other forms of leading a nation were being considered besides the ever so popular and rominent monarchy, such as a constitutional monarchy in which the people were given significantly greater freedom and involvement in decision making processes, which would eventually become a rough design for our modern day democracy. But in the case of African slaves in the United States, this hierarchy of absolute power and control appeared insurmountable. Forced to live terrible lives on plantations at the hands of their masters in horrendous conditions, being free someday was all they had to keep them going. This wish was fulfilled in 1863 with the creation of the Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln. The slaves were now free to become independent and lead their own lives. But emancipation, as a matter of fact, was only a large stepping stone for the slaves. But for a few ‘privileged’ slaves who served as house servants, the â€Å"sunrise-to-sunset† back-breaking jobs on farms and plantations became their vocation for which many were unaccustomed to. They were punished for any flimsy reason with a variety of objects and instruments including whips, knives, guns and field tools. They were hanged, forced to walk a treadmill, placed in chains and shackles or in various contraptions such as thick and heavy metal collars with protruding spikes that made fieldwork difficult and prevented the slave from sleeping while lying down. Even the most kindly and humane masters used the threat of violence to force these field hands to work from dawn to dusk. Runaways were also heavily punished, mercilessly flogged in the presence of all the slaves assembled from the neighboring plantations, chained with heavy weights round the neck, or chained to another person, sometimes of the opposite sex for an extended period and flogged repeatedly. As if that were not enough, the wounds of the slaves whipped were burst and rubbed with turpentine and red pepper. Enslaved black women were raped by their owners, members of their owner's families, or their owner's friends, and children who resulted from such rapes were slaves as well. Being pregnant did not spare a slave woman the whip or rod. A hole was dug for her to rest her belly while being whipped. They were also at constant risk of losing members of their families if their owners decided to sell them for profit, punishment, or to pay debts. Slavery indeed was dehumanizing in every sense of the word. The Declaration of Emancipation was monumental, and came with the renewed sense of hope that life after their emancipation would become significantly better. Being free, the former slaves envisaged being able to live with a sense of purpose and pride in a land ripe with a cornucopia of opportunities waiting to be capitalized on. Spirits were high and celebration took place as ideas and fantasies of a rich lifestyle with a good standard of living were being formulated. [1] For some ex slaves, their dreams became somewhat of a reality as their fight for survival during slavery helped them develop the wits needed to succeed in their new found world. Unfortunately, there were many tragic disappointments, as nearly all the slaves that were emancipated were forced to return back to their old masters after leaving the plantations, starving and diseased. [2] Many were not able to survive on their own. This came as a result of both internal and external forces – being somewhat trapped by their own helplessness, insecurities, lack of knowledge[3] and still viewed as slaves by the whites. Even though former slaves became free to travel throughout the south daring to leave the plantation to visit or search for loved ones from whom they had become separated was no small feat. Other challenges also included deciding on a name as well as the more elusive task of creating an identity with no sense of one's ancestry, making choices for themselves about where they labored and the type of work they performed, the use of public accommodations, providing for one's daily needs and pursuing an education. When one lives at the hands and mercy of a master who controls every aspect of one’s life, starting fresh in a ‘foreign country’ can prove to be a difficult task. For many of them, the dream was short-lived. In many respects, the slaves were not solely responsible for their burdens or inability to rise to freedom. Simply declaring that the slaves were free did not go far enough to enable them become self-determined. They needed the help and guidance of those in control not only to survive but also to thrive. Without much land, money, materials or no legal title to aid them, they soon became ‘freed’ in name only, rather than as legal citizens who were entitled to the most basic liberties. It was no wonder news about the passing of the Thirteenth Amendment in January 1865, was greeted with euphoria and relief. This new chapter in American history was to fully abolish slavery in the United States, ‘freeing’ four million African Americans. Men and women – black and white, and in the North and South began the work of rebuilding the shattered union and of creating a new social order called Reconstruction that would hold many promises. Many young blacks also joined the army upon encouragement from military generals, lured in by the prospect of earning money and the being accepted by the whites. [4] Furthermore, with the protection of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution and the Civil Rights Act of 1866, citizenship was to be granted to all people born or naturalized in the United States and guaranteeing that no American (including the freed slaves) would be denied the right to vote on the basis of race. With that, the freed Southern black men began to exercise this right to vote and actively participate in the political process, many being elected to the United States Congress and local offices. Racial lines seemed to begin to diminish as coalitions of white and black Republicans passed bills to establish the first public school systems in most states of the South, although sufficient funding was hard to find. Freedom truly seemed to fill the air. They also met in annual conventions across the nation and issued heart-felt addresses to the people of the United States, to affirm their status as citizens and implore the support of fair-minded white people. In spite of the daunting challenges, former African-American slaves were determined to succeed in their new found freedom; and they did – making significant strides in establishing their own churches, towns and businesses. Their quest for equality, and the opportunity to live in harmony with any other ethnic group in the country[5] prompted their swift rejection of President Lincoln’s 1862 offer to segregate them to the District of Columbia, which they could colonize. Even with the winds of the Thirteenth Amendment on their backs, the ride to freedom was everything but smooth. Opponents of this progress soon rallied against the former slaves' freedom and began to find means for eroding the gains for which many had shed their blood. Some Whites were even skeptical in the first place, stating that the slaves should have – at least – been in some way educated or prepared for freedom, before it was so suddenly thrust upon them so they didn’t become an evil and menace to the welfare of the entire country. White supremacists sought to return blacks to their subordinate status under slavery. They resurrected barriers and enacted new laws to segregate society along racial lines. They limited black access to transportation, schools, restaurants and other public facilities. The groundbreaking advances of Reconstruction were quickly being reversed. Extreme racist Southerners hated them just as much if not more than before they were freed. Forming anti-black groups such as the Klu Klux Klan they continued to harass and persecute them with unimaginable acts of violence. As rioting increased by enraged white people against African Americans – whom they accused of stealing their jobs – millions of these former slaves began living in a constant state of anxiety and fear.. While most blacks were denied their right to keep and bear arms and therefore unable to protect themselves or their families, lynching increasingly became the weapon of white mob terror. A combination of similar acts of oppression such as fraud and intimidation were also employed to reduce black voting and regain control of state legislatures. Laws or provisions passed such as poll taxes, residency requirements and literacy tests made voter registration and elections more complicated which overwhelmingly disadvantaged blacks. Litigation to challenge such provisions at the state and national levels were to no avail as the Supreme Court upheld the states’ decisions. Their treatment and accommodations became inferior to those provided for white Americans, systematizing a number of economic, educational and social disadvantages. Black soldiers for instance, were not given as much pay as their fellow white soldiers, and it was only until they appealed through a letter to Abraham Lincoln that this policy was changed to even the pay scale. [6] Segregation in all public facilities, with a supposedly â€Å"separate but equal† was also mandated. Conclusion The crux of the Emancipation Proclamation – which advocated abolition of slavery – was easier said than done. It simply raised the hopes of many enslaved African Americans about the prospect of freedom only to leave them still despairing. African Americans continued suffer from segregation, lack of education, and political disenfranchisement. Freedom for them appeared to be superficial, if at all existent– only fulfilling their desire to truly make lives for themselves, while ignoring or depriving them of the means to achieve it. They were still unprotected from the brutal attacks suffered at the hands of anti-Negro groups[7] who still despised them, and granted no help in developing a new lifestyle. The lack of equality, legal or human rights made achieving anything remarkably unfair and near impossible. Life was just as it was under the bondage of slavery. Hence for all the good intentions for the abolition of slavery , the Declaration of Emancipation did not truly spell freedom and equality for all African-American slaves, nor did it directly lead to a lasting increased quality of life or standard of living. It was a huge step towards the beginning of a long, painful struggle for freedom – far longer and more difficult than anyone could realize. The ruling government could and should have done more to quell the uprisings the emancipation triggered, and worked towards helping the former slaves establish themselves while integrating them with other groups to live in peace. It was the thirteenth amendment passed after the end of the American Civil War which permanently abolished slavery and also paved the way for further amendments to the constitution that would brought complete freedom for the former slaves.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Discussion and Debate Tourism Lesson for ESL

Many thanks to Kevin Roche, a colleague of mine, who has kindly allowed me to include his conversation lesson on the site. Tourism is becoming more and more important — especially for those learning English. Here is a two-part lesson which focuses on the question of developing tourism as an industry in your local town. Students need to develop concepts, discuss local economic problems and solutions to those problems, think about possible negative impacts and finally make a presentation. These two lessons provide a great long-term project for upper-level students while offering an opportunity to use English in a number of authentic settings. Let's Do Tourism - Part 1 Aim Discussion, explaining, reasoning, agreeing and disagreeing Activity Tourism — Do we need it? Discussion of pros and cons of developing local tourism Level Upper intermediate to advanced Outline Split students into two groups — one group representatives of Lets Do Tourism, a tourism development company. The other group representatives of the residents of your city and are in opposition to the plans of Lets Do tourism.Give each student a copy of one of the discussion notes.Ask students if they have any questions on the explanatory notes.Give students fifteen minutes to prepare for the discussion in their groups. Students should discuss the points mentioned and any other points they may come up within their groups.Circulate around the classroom helping students and taking notes on common language problems.Have students get back together and try to convince you (or another chosen group of students) of their reasoning.Begin the activity follow-up by going over some of the more common mistakes made by students.Finish the activity as a class by asking each student to choose one reason either for or against the project. Each student should then discuss one of the points in f ront of the rest of the class. Ask other students to comment on the arguments presented. Your Town, The Next Tourist Paradise? A company called lets Do Tourism is panning to invest a large amount of money to turn your town into a major center for tourists. They have made plans to manufacture a number of hotels and other tourist infrastructure in your town. As well as the hotels, they have also made plans to radically improve the nightlife in your town by opening a string of clubs and bars. They hope that by the year 2004 your town will be a major competitor within the tourist industry in your country.   Group 1 You are representatives of Lets Do Tourism your aim is to promote the plans of your company and to convince me that tourism is the best solutions for your city. Points to concentrate on: The increase in jobs that will come with the increase in investment.The money that the tourists will bring into the local economyThe progress and development of your city which will result in it becoming more important with not only your region but also your country as well.Better for the young people of your city as there will be much more investment in leisure industries. Group 2 You are the representatives of the residents of your city and are in opposition to the plans of Lets Do tourism. Your aim is to convince me that this is a bad idea for your town. Points to consider: Environmental issues - tourists pollutionTroublemakers - many tourists have no respect for the places they visit and are only interested in getting drunk and causing trouble.The rise in tourism will bring about radical changes and will result in the traditional way of life in your town being lost. Perhaps forever.Rather than promoting the position of your city in your country, this move will make your city the laughing stock of your country.